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Scentsy Candle Bar Update and Discontinued Scents

Discontinued Warmers & Scents
UPDATE. To see the Current Discontinued Scentsy Candle Products I wanted to remind you that everything in the Fall/Winter Catalog will be 10% off during the month of February to make room for the new Spring/Summer Catalog which will be effective March 1st. Here is a list of the Scentsy Bars that will be discontinued in the Spring/Summer catalog. They will be available for purchase until February 28th or until they are sold out, whichever comes first... DISCONTINUED SCENTSY BARS: Amaretto, Bayberry, Cherry Clove Chutney, Christmas Tree, Clementine Tea, Clove & Pepper, Coffee Tree, Cozy Fireside, Creamy Nutmeg, Fried Ice Cream, Grove & Clove, Mulberry Apple Marsala, Orchid Sake, Pear Crumble, Redwood & Cedar, Snowberry, True Vanilla, White Pepper & Clove, & Winter Wonderland. Order February and receive additional 10%…
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Yankee Candles vs Scentsy which is better?

Scentsy
Not only are Scentsy Scented Candles safer for the environment you save so much money with Scentsy. Scentsy One Candle Warmer $30.00 plus 12 Candle Bars = $80.00 (1 Candle Bar Per Month - Tax & Shipping Not Included) Our Candle Bars burn an average of 60 to 80 hours. Yankee Candles Jar Candle - 12 x $21.99 (14.5oz) = $263.88 (1 Jar Candle Per Month - Tax & Shipping Not Included) Candle burns an average of 65 to 90 hours. Jar Candle $263.88 - $80.00 Scentsy = $183.88 Scentsy Savings! Remember, unlike old sooty jars, you still have your beautiful candle warmer. A beautiful Scentsy warmer requires only a one time purchase!
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Allergies and Candle Soot – Think Wickfree

Scentsy
This is an article from the The Allergy and Environmental Health Association Black Soot Deposition… Also referred to as "ghosting," "carbon tracking," "carbon tracing" and "dirty house syndrome," has become an increasing complaint of homeowners and apartment residents throughout the country. Since 1992, the occurrence rate of complaints received at the Florida Department of Health rose from two-a-year to, at times, two-a-week. Several factors are believed to contribute to the deposition of carbon soot in residences, but a full understanding of the cause and mechanism is still forthcoming. Several theories have been suggested by those investigating the phenomenon. Where Does The Soot Come From? Soot is a product of incomplete combustion of carbon-containing fuels, usually petroleum-based. Complete combustion would, in theory, produce practically no soot or carbon monoxide, and is…
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